Andrew Quanbeck

University of Wisconsin – Madison

arquanbe@wisc.edu

Andrew Quanbeck, PhD, is an assistant professor in the University of Wisconsin’s Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and an honorary associate of the University of Wisconsin’s Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering. He heads the Implementation Science and Engineering Lab at the University of Wisconsin (isel.wisc.edu). Dr. Quanbeck’s research draws upon concepts from systems engineering in developing innovative approaches to implementing evidence-based practices in healthcare. His research focuses specifically on the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders in primary care settings. He has been the principal investigator on K01, R34, and R13 grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and is currently the principal investigator on two NIH R01 grants. One study, funded by the National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) from 2018 – 2023, investigates the use of mobile health technology among patients in primary care who wish to reduce their alcohol consumption. The other study, funded by NIDA (also from 2018 – 2023) uses an innovative blend of implementation strategies named “systems consultation” to promote the use of clinical guidelines for opioid prescribing. Dr. Quanbeck has authored 29 peer-reviewed papers.

Dr. Quanbeck has a leadership role in dissemination and implementation at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. As a faculty member at the university’s Clinical and Translational Science Award program, he consults with clinical researchers across campus to help them apply D & I concepts to extend the impact of their work. He also organizes and runs the annual D & I Short Course, a conference held on campus each fall that brings in national leaders to teach D & I principles to a wide array of investigators on campus. Dr. Quanbeck makes presentations each year on his own D & I research at the Annual Research Meeting of AcademyHealth, the national’s premier health services research organization. At the annual research conference on D&I research hosted by NIH and AcademyHealth each December, he has made presentations, chaired symposia, and reviewed abstracts annually since 2015. He has published results of his research in Implementation Science and also reviews papers for the journal. He has served on the grant review committee of CRAN—the Collaborative Research on Addiction at NIH—a program that promotes collaboration among researchers at NIAAA, NIDA, and the National Cancer Institute in promoting system-level implementation of interventions for the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders. He has served as an ad hoc reviewer for NIH’s Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health study section. Internationally, Dr. Quanbeck has presented his D&I research at the Nordic Implementation Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Dr. Quanbeck very much appreciates the unique opportunity that IRI provides junior investigators to spend time thinking and talking about D & I research with many of the field’s most eminent intellectual leaders. He is grateful for the mentoring he has received through IRI and deeply appreciates the commitment shown by IRI mentors from Washington University and other institutions to cultivating the next generation of D&I leaders. Through IRI, Dr. Quanbeck has also formed and fostered relationships with other IRI fellows, leading to opportunities for collaboration in conference submissions, writing papers, and grant submissions.